Human Resources Management and Organizational Behavior

Highlights of Recent and Ongoing Research


Human Resources Management and Organizational Behavior

 
Employee Entitlement in Organizational Settings.
Professor Glenda Fisk (with Dr. Lukas Neville (U of Manitoba) are collaborating on a project that seeks to understand the important issue of why some employees feel a stronger sense of “entitlement” in organizational settings.
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How do we manage employees with a strong sense of entitlement?
Professor Glenda Fisk (with Dr. Lukas Neville (U of Manitoba) are exploring strategies by which employee entitlement may be managed.  While entitlement is traditionally defined as a relatively stable personality trait, it is important to note that some experts acknowledge the possibility that it can change over time, with dedicated effort.
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What are the work experiences of direct support employees in the developmental services sector? Professor Hickey is examining the job satisfaction, experiences of burnout and occupational stress, organizational commitment, perceptions of organizational support, and prosocial motivation of workers in this key social services sector.
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For those working on the organizational frontlines, can interactions with clients be energizing instead of draining?
Professor Jacoba Lilius’ research aims to develop understanding the complex nature and consequences of frontline workers’ interactions with their clients (i.e., customers, patients, students, etc., depending on the context). This research is driven by what she saw as a contrast between how such interactions tend to be understood in the research literature -- as depleting and a source of burnout – and how she heard those working on the frontlines describing them. Specifically, while frontline workers described some interactions as draining and requiring some type of recovery during off-work time, others were described as providing a sort of ‘boost’ that provided a source of motivation that carried them through more challenging interactions.  Professor Lilius has developed a theoretical typology of client interactions to capture this variability and is currently running a SSHRC-funded project aimed at empirical testing of these ideas. Read more…


Can organizations be sites of compassion for their employees?
Professor Jacoba Lilius is part of a research collaborative called the CompassionLab, a research group which aims to develop understanding of the nature, consequences, and conditions that support compassion in work organizations.  This work is predicated on the idea that employees are often suffering at work, stemming from events in their personal lives (e.g., the loss or illness of a loved one, physical or mental illness) or experiences within the workplace (e.g., incivility from colleagues or customers). Compassion can make an important difference for those suffering, and can be encouraged (or discouraged) by organizations. Read more… www.compassionlab.com